Artist takes different take on movies and the directors who made these films classics.

One of the greatest weapons an artist has in his arsenal is satire, and while writers have a fairly larger battlefield to use this weapon, others like painters have a fairly limited use for it.

You would think sculptors would have even far less opportunities to use this medium in their work, and for most creations in the art world, this would be true too. One look at Mike Leavitt’s latest lineup of sculptures however, will tell you a very different, and quite impressive, story.

First, let’s take a look at the subjects of his sculptures.

What do Quentin Tarantino, Stanley Kubrick, Steven Spielberg, Alfred Hitchcock, David Lynch, Kathryn Bigelow, James Cameron, George Lucas, Orson Welles, Martin Scorsese, Spike Lee, Woody Allen, Wes Anderson, Hayao Miyazaki, Francis Ford Coppola and Tim Burton have in common?

Well, apart from the fact that these are some of the most popular, and probably all-time acclaimed directors from the film industry, the one common factor all these geniuses share is that their unparalleled dedication to their art has given birth to some of the most memorable, if not quirky characters, the film medium has seen. In some cases, these are actors who have played their part so well under an able director that their roles have gone down in history as among the best the world has seen, while in others it has even been a prop.

And what Leavitt does with this is astonishing. Leavitt has cerebrally singled out his take on every film director’s most memorable collaboration with his or her work, and given it the form of a painstakingly created sculpture. Using the mediums of wood and polymer, the sculptures in the King Cuts collection are Leavitt’s “totems of satire and devotion” to these 16 directors who have excelled in their art like few others.

The accolades are pouring in of course, and Pepper Kaminoff is among those praising Leavitt for his extraordinary pursuit.

“Each character is gentle and accurate, sober. Not sketches or cartoons, but likenesses that are disarming and funny. Leavitt does scary very well,” says Kaminoff.

Leavitt of course has his own artistic reasons for the project.

“Moviemakers are consumed by their work, similar to the way my own work overtakes my life,” he says.

One look at the extreme levels of detailing behind each of his 16 sculptures from the King Cuts will tell you exactly what he means!

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