Drone Images Reveal the Ugly Side of Inequality in South Africa

Sometimes, it takes an eagle’s eye view to gain some perspective on reality. This time around, it was a drone that did the job. Revealing the ugly side of inequality in South Africa, this is a story about images the world is talking about today, are they are indeed truly shocking.

In a series of images that photographer Johnny Miller has captured to bring to light the segregation that still exists in South Africa, one can easily identify the stark contrast between habitats occupied by the white and non white communities.

With the DJI Inspire One drone as his gadget of choice, Miller gives a realistic touch to the fear and sense of separation that still thrives in a country that supposedly gave up its discriminating ways more than two decades ago, at least on paper.

The truth however, is far from what the erstwhile leaders of South Africa, including the great Nelson Mandela, had wished for the country and its people.  From several meters up in the air, above well-known localities in Cape Town, Johannesburg and Durban, the images that Miller has captured are thought-provoking.

Here are a few images and the disturbing stories behind them.

The Papwa Sewgolum Golf Course along the Umgeni River in Durban was named after a path-breaking golfer of Indian descent, Sewsunker “Papwa” Sewgolum, one of the many faces representing the challenging times of a country troubled by its racist ways.

Today, the name of the golf course reminds us of how Sewgolum was the only non-white among 113 players at the 1965 Natal Open, and then how he received the trophy outside in the pouting rain because non-whites were not allowed into the clubhouse.

Half a century later though, the images still remind the world of the unseen line that still exists.

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Then, there’s the Vusimuzi settlement in Johannesburg. Located right alongside the Mooifontein Cemetery, the 8,500 shacks here have 30,000 people living in them, and while high-tension power lines pass overhead, carrying electricity to parts of Johannesburg, this locality is without a reliable power supply line.

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There are other stories as well, with compelling images accompanying them. Visit Miller’s special website aptly named unequalscenes.com for more.

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