A House Missing its Other Half Turns Heads in St. Patrick Street, Toronto, Canada

At first glance, a photograph of a house in St. Patrick Street may not be that remarkable. However on further inspection, it becomes so hard to miss the fact that the property has its half missing. It is not an optical illusion, but an actually house that appears to have been sliced. This bizarre house stands in the heart of Toronto, Canada and is the only surviving house in what used to be a row of six matching properties.

Image Source: huffingtonpost.ca

Image Source: huffingtonpost.ca

With a peculiar name, which is all suggestive, the house is named 54-1/2 meaning that it is the remaining half of house number 54. In fact, the row houses are strangely numbered 52, 52-1/2, 54, 54-1/2, 56, 58 and 60. According to BlogTO.com, the neighborhood was in dire poverty way back in 1950s and most of the blocks that had been built in the 1890s were bought up by Windlass Holdings Ltd. The company would go on to build a popular condo complex, named Village by Grange.

Image Source: huffingtonpost.ca

Image Source: huffingtonpost.ca

According to this blog, the owner of house number 54 St. Patrick Street once complained to the Toronto Star that the company’s action in acquiring the blocks and building a condo village was driven by greed and full of ‘extreme example of blockbusting’.

Image Source: huffingtonpost.ca

Image Source: huffingtonpost.ca

As strange as it may sound, house number 54-1/2 St. Patrick Street has survived many decades and seems to still have a long way to go. Whatever the tactics the company used in acquiring other houses, the owner of house number 54-1/2 never sold his/her property.

The property is currently vacant and is valued at an impressive 648,000 Canadian dollars.